Freeware Windows based on Microsoft Hyper-V Server

Forums Operating Systems Windows Server 2016 Miscellaneous Freeware Windows based on Microsoft Hyper-V Server

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    • #45091
      Lotusisrael
      Moderator

      As most of you know, there is a freeware version of Windows available from Microsoft, called Microsoft Hyper-V server.
      It is a stripped down, server-core like Windows Server, on which only the Hyper-V role is present.
      Although the GUI is almost absent, with no Windows Explorer, there are other typical Windows features that are there.
      Browsers like Firefox or Chrome are installable, software like 7zip or Winrar, VLC or SMPlayer etc.
      Somebody even put up a minimal GUI for it, that is loosely similar to Ubuntu Unity.

      So, I see an opportunity here.
      On this, we can have a freeware Windows for everyone, letting go all the drawbacks of piracy.
      The only major turn off, so far, is the absence of Windows Audio service.
      So, does anybody know a way to fully replace the Windows Audio service?
      Update: I have got an answer on My Digital Life to try this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_Stream_Input/Output
      I do not understand if it replaces both the audio driver, and the Windows Audio service. The second thing would be the most important part.

    • #61288
      Anonymous

      Very cool find Lotusisrael, I expect this would run alternative shells as well like LiteStep, NextStart, and maybe even some of the components of ClassicShell — or possibly even run Steam as the Windows shell. I guess you’d have to use a third party file manager but there are thousands of those, many much more powerful then Windows Explorer — that also obviate needing separate file viewers and utilities. This may be a real net positive for Gamers and those that run 3D render applications where you wan’t as little other stuff interrupting the CPU, GPU and fighting for memory locations as possible.

    • #61290
      Anonymous

      The solution for Windows Audio on My Digital Life did not worked, or least I could not find a way to make it work. .Net Framework 3.5 is available on the installation iso, the only thing required is to get audio to work. The rest seems rather easy. But a CPU with HAV enabled would be required, since Hyper-V needs it. The developer of the GUI created a new version of the GUI, it is a fusion between Windows Explorer and Gnome. So, any idea for audio?

    • #61289
      Anonymous

      My understanding of how Windows audio has been virtualized in Hyper-V, and drivers now are virtulaized and kept out of Ring-0 on Microsoft operating systems since kernel 6.1 — is that you’ll need the Windows Audio Services running for audio to work on a locally installed OS. If these services are not in some way contained in the distribution I think this may be the end of the road unless you can force the installation of Windows XP audio drivers.

    • #61291
      Anonymous

      @hoak wrote:

      My understanding of how Windows audio has been virtualized in Hyper-V, and drivers now are virtulaized and kept out of Ring-0 on Microsoft operating systems since kernel 6.1 — is that you’ll need the Windows Audio Services running for audio to work on a locally installed OS. If these services are not in some way contained in the distribution I think this may be the end of the road unless you can force the installation of Windows XP audio drivers.

      You mean audio does not run on kernel mode since Windows NT 6.1 ?
      Windows XP drivers for new hardware would be harder and harder to find. An open source equivalent would be great.
      Another idea would get React OS to work on top of this Windows. ReactOS is developed pretty slow, it is only compatible with XP. This is consuming resources and time for the developers. A thing would be to port the upper parts of the react OS to run MS Hyper-V Server 2016. This way it will run on real Windows, a greater compatibility with today standards and development resources and time would be used more efficiently.

    • #61292
      Anonymous

      I thought I had read somewhere that there is a compatibility mode to run a lot of old kernel mode drivers on newer versions of Windows; this was quite some time ago post Vista early Windows 7 but it did work for a lot of sound cards that did not offer updated protected mode drivers.

    • #61293
      Anonymous

      I have tried to present the idea on the ReactOS forums, but they refused to help, they were quite hostile to it. I do not understand why exactly. Perhaps one virtual sound card software might be the solution. When I have the time, I shall try this. I need something that, although designed for a standard Windows edition, to be made to replace all the native Windows Audio function. The idea of XP drivers seems not that good for me, since those are really old and they shall get older as new Windows editions are launched.
      I think a sound card emulation would be necessary. There are some clues about how this could be achieved found by googling, but nothing clear. There were some Creative Sound Blaster emulator for DOS a few years back. Themselves do not help too much, but they give a horizon as proof of concept. VMware Workstation contains such an emulator in the products, but I could not find a standalone installer. I knew, if I remember correctly, that Creative Sound Blaster audio cards did not brought just their drivers, but a new audio service, separated from Windows Audio itself.

    • #61294
      Anonymous

      @Lotusisrael wrote:

      I have tried to present the idea on the ReactOS forums, but they refused to help, they were quite hostile to it. I do not understand why exactly. Perhaps one virtual sound card software might be the solution. When I have the time, I shall try this. I need something that, although designed for a standard Windows edition, to be made to replace all the native Windows Audio function. The idea of XP drivers seems not that good for me, spanish dictionary since those are really old and they shall get older as new Windows editions are launched.
      I think a sound card emulation would be necessary. There are some clues about how this could be achieved found by googling, but nothing clear. There were some Creative Sound Blaster emulator for DOS a few years back. Themselves do not help too much, but they give a horizon as proof of concept. VMware Workstation contains such an emulator in the products, but I could not find a standalone installer. I knew, if I remember correctly, that Creative Sound Blaster audio cards did not brought just their drivers, but a new audio service, separated from Windows Audio itself.

      a sound card emulation would be necessary….

    • #61295
      Anonymous

      Indeed, tried to get some help on this on the Jplay forums, also on ReactOS forums. I know. Little to no succes, altough it is clearly possible, nobody is interested in this. They prefer to stick to a standard Windows installation or to hack such a Windows installation to get (illegally) the audio components, then bring them to the target OS.
      There is some audio card emulation on Vmware Workstation, if we managed to get that emulation in MS Hyper-V Server, I do not know if it would be legal. Porting the audio components from ReactOS seems the best shot, but I found noboby willing to do the work. I am not a programmer, I can not do it myself.

    • #64526

      I have tried to present the idea on the ReactOS forums, but they refused to help, they were quite hostile to it. I do not understand why exactly. Perhaps one virtual sound card software might be the solution. When I have the time, I shall try this. I need something that, although designed for a standard Windows edition, to be made to replace all the native Windows Audio function. The idea of XP drivers seems not that good for me, since those are really old and they shall get older as new Windows editions are launched.

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