Browser Testing: IE 9 vs Chrome 6 vs Opera 10.6 vs Firefox 4

Forums Operating Systems Windows Server 2008 R2 Miscellaneous Browser Testing: IE 9 vs Chrome 6 vs Opera 10.6 vs Firefox 4

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #51061

      i just wanna getting off ie8 🙂
      but i will still use ff 🙂

    • #51062

      @aviv00 wrote:

      i just wanna getting off ie8 🙂
      but i will still use ff 🙂

      I personally think these latest builds of Firefox 3.5+ and later are a joke. It’s a big memory hog, takes forever to boot up and is constantly crashing whenever you have multiple tabs open or extensions running. Of course IE8 does this when you try to load a youtube video sometimes! LOL. But i’ve noticed IE8 crashes a lot less often than Firefox does. As for Chrome it doesn’t crash as nearly as often as Firefox and the only time i’ve noticed it crash is due to incompatibility reasons. I really like Chrome the best but if IE9 is going to run just as fast as Chrome and offer stability I’m switching back to IE. And I haven’t been a fan of IE since 6.

      I have found that you can enhance your FF experience by clearing out your temporary files and cache every so often even though it does prefetch data firefox has a problem when the browsers paging file because so large. Also disabling extensions helps. Part of what makes Google Chrome great not only its lightweight browser but the process isolation as well. Each tab runs independently of each other in a new process. If you open up chrome and open up a new tab you’ll see two “chrome.exe” processes. So if one tab is going memory crazy and crashes it doesn’t effect your other tabs running and the whole browser itself doesn’t shut down. You can use Chrome’s task manager to kill a unresponsive tab but it doesn’t kill the window. You have to manually close it yourself which makes no sense. If you’re going to kill the process altogether why not just close the window altogether?

    • #51063

      personaly i relly love opera 10.6 this browser is really fast , bug less and use lesser ram than IE and ffox …. the interface is really cool too

      before i was an user of ffox since 3-4 year and now i use only opera

    • #51064

      @MaLiXs wrote:

      personaly i relly love opera 10.6 this browser is really fast , bug less and use lesser ram than IE and ffox …. the interface is really cool too

      before i was an user of ffox since 3-4 year and now i use only opera

      Yeah the new Firefox 4 beta browser is a complete rip-off of Opera’s interface.


      Firefox 4.0
      Courtesy: Downloadmozilla.com


      Opera 10.50
      Courtesy: cfzone.net

    • #51065

      Man, I sure hope IE9 won’t be copying the UI layout that other browsers seem to be heading towards, with the weird menu button and tabs above the address bar.

    • #51066

      i have ssd so ff is ok here
      once i had hdd its was very slow open tab and search for the right url
      really annoying but now everything is ok

      lately at the last updates of ff i got same crashes but everything is ok so far

      about ie8 cant stand this browser
      every sample thing take long time
      its like AV bulid in to it

    • #44095

      I pitted the 4 most commonly used browsers by Windows users in a series of extensive benchmarking tests to determine their performance against each other.

      Test #1: HTML5 Canvas Rendering

      This test uses hardware acceleration that determines how fast a browser is at rendering fish. For this particular test I strained the browser to the maximum by selecting 1,000 fish.

      Firefox 4.0 was able to achieve 20 frames per seconds, 70% faster than Google Chrome.

      Chrome 6 on the other hand was only able to beat out Opera by 1 FPS.

      Internet Explorer 9 was a pleasant surprise. It handled HTML5 rendering with ease, although not as great as Firefox it still rendered a respectable 17 frames per second.

      WINNER: Mozilla Firefox 4.0, but a respectable showing out of Internet Explorer. It should also be greatly noted that not all websites are standardized for GPU-acceleration so for now in the immediate future this test is not as important.

      Test #2: Web Page Loading Times

      A web browser should be able to do what a web browser does – load web pages. For most of us the primary benefactor is load times. For this test I decided to break them down into a series of tests. Sports, Social Networking, Shopping, and Search Engines. I know its not possible to cover every single website or interest, but I decided to pick some of the most popular ones. This test isn’t 100% proof but it gives you a general idea of which browser is preferred.

      Sports junkie? Google Chrome or Opera is your choice.

      Obsessed with Myspace + Youtube? IE 9 performs the best, but Firefox 4 is only tenths of a second behind.

      Shopping all the time? Chrome shines.

      A research buff? Firefox 4 will give you more.

      Test #3: Acid3 Test

      The Acid3 test is a standard method in determining how well a browser is adapt to loading current web standards such as DOM and Javascript.

      Fittingly, Chrome passes the Acid3 test as it was developed by a former Google employee named Ian Hickson. Chrome and Opera were the only browsers to pass this test, with Firefox coming in 2nd with 97/100 and IE 9 in last place with 83/100. While Internet Explorer does come in last place in this test, it is still worth mentioning that Internet Explorer 8 was only able to score a 22/100 primary due to its proprietary design and inability to adhere to common web standards.

      Test #4: Celtic Kane’s Javascript Engine load times

      This test measures a browser’s raw speed. It measures your browsers javascript engine’s ability to load javascript into a webpage, which is very important as many browsers rely on javascript for rendering. Faster load times equals greater performance.

      1. Opera @ 107ms
      2. Chrome @ 130ms
      3. Firefox @ 223ms
      4. IE @ 243ms

      The winner was Opera 10.6 but not by much over Chrome.

      Test #5: Initial Load Times

      I call this the “annoyance factor test”. It is a simple test, but probably one of the most important in determining a user’s browser experience. You boot your machine up in the morning, log onto windows, and click on your web browser and wait for it to load for the first time. Which browser shines the test at this?

      To my surprise, Internet Explorer 9 was the winner by a full 2 seconds over Google Chrome 6. Opera comes in 3rd in just under 8 seconds, while Firefox 4 fails to live up to expectations at faster loading times then its predecessors with a disappointing 22 second load time.

      My pick: Internet Explorer 9

      Internet Explorer 9 has showed vast improvements over its previous browser by showing signs that Microsoft is finally beginning to adhere to the most recent web standards, as evidenced by its ability to use the GPU to render complex web graphics. I was also impressed by its initial load time, which before IE 9, Chrome was always the decisive winner. Browsing speed was very impressive on the new Firefox 4 browser but it fails to receive any recommendation from me based on its disappointed initial load times. Also, although I never tested Firefox with any add-ons it should be noted that installing add-ons onto firefox would only fuel the bloat of the initial load time and thus making it a very annoying browser to use when you need it most. Compatibility is a concern with browsers as well. Some websites do not even support Google Chrome at all, but as many of today’s browsers begin to adhere to today’s web standards I don’t think that should be a problem in the near future. Also interesting thing to note is that Chrome is currently in develeopment at providing native HTML5 video support for its future Chrome browsers which should make it interesting to see how it performs in the IE Fish Tank test in the near future. While IE 9 currently does not contain a full GUI to control the browser a combination of its speed, rendering, and compatibility make it my overall winner. I picked IE not because it was the fastest in any particular test but because it has showed great signs of potential. For example in Google’s V8 Benchmark Suite which measures Javascript performance, IE 8 was only able to score 102 points, while IE 9 was able to acheive 1139, a huge improvement, even higher than Firefox 4 with only 909 points. Also considering that IE is not even in beta release and the full version isn’t scheduled to be out from Microsoft until 2011. For now due to its limited GUI I would recommend sticking with Chrome, but look forward to the beta release of IE 9 next month!

Viewing 5 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.